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Posts Tagged ‘consignors’

I want to be your friend, so tell me how, says TGtbT.blog… so tell me stuff I need to know to not be

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1701xx-malloreigh_wearing_boxing_glovesGive your best consignors a punch…

a punch card that is!

Sonya Nix of Better Than Before Consignments mentioned in a private forum that once, she gave (more…)

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There are laws in resale you must not flout, a post on AuntieKate.wordpress.com, the Professional Resalers' resource.You must obey this law… and if you don’t, you will suffer.

While flouting this law won’t get you a jail sentence,  it could contribute to the death of your business.

What law are we looking at here? (more…)

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Kate’s Miracle SPINAL INSERTION MACHINE. Line up to the left, please, and have your ride token ready for collection.

Ever wish, as a shopkeeper, that you could get a spine, and stop feeling bad when people tromp all over you and then expect you to feel happy about it? That you could stop apologizing for running your business in a way that allows your business to exist?

Well, Kate to the rescue. Here’s a nice (more…)

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There’s nothing more “local” than resale, consignment, and thrift shops.

After all, we’re not only locally-owned, but locally-sourced as well. In fact, we’re in the forefront of the Dress Local or Decorate Local movement, aren’t we?

Some handy resources for advertising that YOU are the ULTIMATE in the Shop Local movement:

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You are the last person to ask about how yiur consignment shop should work, on auntiekate.wordpress.comWhen you first started out, you probably based your business plan for your consignment or resale shop on what you wanted or thought you’d want if you were a customer. And that’s okay, ’cause you had lifelong experience as a customer. Your gut instinct (along with the advice in Too Good to be Threw Complete Operations Manual) got you started.

But now, whether you’re a year in or twenty years in, you have lost something… and it’s for the better.

You are no longer a “typical customer”… and you can no longer go with your feelings when making decisions about how your shop will grow and develop.

So stop asking yourself “What would I like?”

Instead, ask “What would my target customer like?”  For example, you may have, back when you opened, chosen to have business hours that ended at 5pm. After all, we need to be home to get supper on for the family, you reasoned. Women haven’t got the time to shop after work. But if you continue to close at 5pm, because that was your decision way-back-when…. and don’t use your recent experience to observe that many of your shoppers want to shop on their way home from work… at 5:15 or 5:45 or even, depending on your market, at 6:15… you may be hampering the growth of your business.

In other words, once you become a shopkeeper,

your typical-shopper instincts wither and die.

You no longer can walk into a new-merchandise store, whether it’s a department store, a boutique, or a hardware store, the way a typical shopper would. Instead, your shopkeeper mind is cataloging a hundred things: what their signage says. Whether your ease of passage is impeded upon by displays. And so on. You are no longer, and never will be again, the typical shopper. Your personal reaction is no longer a reliable indicator of the right thing to do. But that’s okay, because you have turned into a retailer. A retailer who can ask, instead of What would I like?,

“How can I make their shopping experience more delightful here than anywhere else?”

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Finding the pieces that match: cooperating with nonprofitsWe’ve talked before about consignment and resale shops working with various non-profit groups to help them with their fund-raising… and incidentally, helping YOUR business with your profile-raising.

The second consignment account I set up in my shop (the first being me, of course… where else would I get to be eternally #1?) was the charity my mother-in-law was so active in. Lee collected, prepped, and stored donations from her chapter until I picked it up and consigned it in the charity’s name.

Another one of my consignment accounts was a not-for-profit group I was active in. This charity never got a check from us… they always used up their credit outfitting women who had a need for interview and career clothing, after completing various courses designed to give them a hand up after difficult situations. Our program of consign/outfit won an international prize from the organization for innovation and results!

Here’s a neat summation of how a Junior League has dealt with the difficulties of one of their past fund-raising events, by partnering with a NFP consignment shop in a very specific, very profitable way.

Read the article in the Woman’s Exchange Consignor News.

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