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Posts Tagged ‘employees’

This situation, sent to Auntie Kate, is challenging. How would you handle it?

Messy buns are cute and au courant. Messy clothes? Never.

Messy buns are cute and au courant. Messy clothes? Never.

I have an employee that is making me so frustrated I can hardly keep from sounding off. She’s been with me for six years, but this problem has been getting worse over the past two years. She’s very dependable, likeable, self-motivated, the customers like her, there are many good qualities about her. However, she comes to work every day looking like a bum. She admittedly shops

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“Do you work here?”

Do you and your crew get this question a lot? Could it be because

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Your consignment shop staff wants to learn!

They want to learn… and you can learn how to manage staff too! Click for TGtbT’s best advice on that.

Let us all pause here and have a moment of appreciation for the people who work in consignment, resale, and thrift shops.

Not only do they have all the duties of a “real store” employee: helping customers, keeping stock neat, chasing down those dust bunnies and clearing our messy dressing rooms…

…but they also must have an encyclopedic knowledge of the wide range of brands, styles, and fits every resale shop offers, and in many cases, they have to know what is acceptable and how much it’s worth.

And they really want to learn. Studies show that one of the main sources of job satisfaction is the opportunity to feel competent. To show your appreciation of their enthusiasm,

provide your people with the info they need to do their jobs well.

Such as:

 

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“Being the leader” is the hardest part of the job to many, if not most, resale shopkeepers. We may be self-motivating…. but when it comes to motivating others, we have a lot to learn.

But that’s the thing: being a boss is a learn-able skill! I love this break-down of leadership styles. Each of us needs to be each of these, at different times and even, sometimes, with a different support staff.What kind of leader re you in your consignment shop?

Graphic from Billzipponbusiness.com

 

There are thousands of blogs and web sites about being the best possible leader of your crew; I suggest you start your education with this resale industry-specific Double Product for the Professional Resaler.

Team Work: Staffing your Store from Too Good to be Threw

Resalers' Resource List: Your Employee HandbookTeam Work: Staffing your Store

PLUS Resource List:
Your Employee Manual

DOUBLE Product!

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After all, some Auntie Kate messages are, ahem, Too Good to be Threw!

Click the image for more Deja Vuesday posts that are too good to be threw from TGtbT.com

Deja Vuesday

where you can visit a gently-used, blog post in case you missed it the first time. It’s even better the second time around.

Staffing is always a challenge in any sort of retail, but even more so in resale retail. But it could be slightly less of a challenge if (more…)

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I don’t have statistics on this, but I strongly suspect that start-up consignment, resale and thrift stores which planned from the beginning to have funds available for support staff, have

fared better, grown faster, and profited sooner

than start-ups which relied solely on the owner working her or his butt off.TGtbT.com says wouldn't it be nice if "working my butt off" was like, for real?

So tell us: did your shop open with just yourself working? Did you feel constrained in your operating hours?

When did you add staff, and what difference did it make in how your business operates and your bottom line?

If you are still, one or more years into your business, working by yourself and/or relying on temporary fill-in help from friends and family, what are your plans for increasing cash flow enough to add a staffer or two or twenty?

Or do you feel that you prefer to be the sole staffer in your shop?

I look forward to your comments!

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151106 digital overloadDoes this sound like you… or your staff?

when we’re tempted to procrastinate, diversions are only a click away… knowledge workers in the United States waste 25% of their time dealing with their huge and growing data streams, costing the economy $997 billion annually.

If so, this Harvard Business Review article may motivate you to re-think that “always-on” Internet connection in your shop’s workstations.

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