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Archive for the ‘I’ve been meaning to tell you’ Category

Where do you find the best information about your resale business?

Well, in our Products for the Professional Resaler, of course. But there’s another source for great ideas you can adapt to your consignment, resale or thrift shop, and that’s (more…)

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3 reasons YOU need a swing shop:

1- You can focus attention on specific categories or styles to keep them moving

2- A swing shop keepsĀ 

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TGtbT.com thinks you'll enjoy this novel about consifgnment and resale shopkeepingSecond Hand, by Michael Zadoorian, will make any shopkeeper smile.

Richard, the proprietor of the imaginary shop Satori Junk, travels from estate sale to thrift store to garage sale in search of (more…)

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Every once in a while, it does a business good to check its links.

Do the links on your web site go where you want them to go? That Facebook icon: does it take folks to your Facebook page or ask them to share your site on their Facebook? Either way’s fine… unless (more…)

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How you could be hurting your business by having too much. And what to do about it. From Too Good to be Threw.

Can anyone look through this merchandise, asks Auntie Kate of TGtbT.com

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Consignment shop clutter

Not only did this shop not de-clutter: they immortalized it in a photo of what was probably a very pretty dress!

While writing in my consumer-oriented journal at HowToConsign.com about how to simplify and give yourself breathing space, the thought kept nagging me:

How about the burdensome clutter in our consignment and resale shops? How much (more…)

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Guys, I tried, I really did.

I was contacted by Real Simple magazine re an article they wanted on buying and selling resale furniture online. (It’s on pages 87-90 in the August issue.)

treasure chest island arrangementI gave them ALL SORTS of reasons to look local, real-life, bricks-and-mortar first. But alas, I was left on the cutting-room floor*.

Not one to waste brain cells, I thought I’d share my reasons to shop real-life first, in case you could use them.

Kate’s Reasons Why You Should Shop In-Person, In Real Life, for Gently-used Furniture

  • Well, the obvious first reason: ’cause you can see and smell it in real life. Computer monitors don’t show colors accurately and they haven’t perfected Smell-o-Vision yet. Who wants pumpkin when they thought it was coral?
  • Touchy-feely is the way to go: Does the finish feel good? The upholstery feel sturdy? Is it weighty or flimsy? Cab you wiggle it to see if it wobbles? Can’t do that on a screen or monitor.
  • Flip it over. Stained? Dust cover ripped or even non-existent? Is the little brass stud on the bottom missing… or replaced with a bottle cap?
  • See it up next to other pieces that might inspire you. Resale furniture stores showcase goods in vignettes which might inspire you (or heck, you may like that armchair over there, better!)
  • Have a shopping experience. I’ve known folks to make fast friends in resale shops, to decide to totally redo the den when they ere looking for a kitchen table to start, and to pick up the Best Ever Chicken with Sun-Dried Tomato Cream Sauce recipe. Not to mention, get bystander opinions, which I have always found helpful.
  • Know who you’re dealing with. Have recourse if needed. Not dealing with strangers, who may be fly-by-night or even less than savory, online.
  • Delivery? It’s cheaper to hire a local company, or even a guy with a pick-up, than shipping something from hundreds or thousands of miles away. Not to mention much more eco-friendly.
  • The usual: Shop Local to keep your local economy going. Support your neighbors. Keep downtown alive.

For more resale furniture/ home decor ideas and suggestions, visit TGtbT.com.

* For digital natives, “The term cutting room floor is used in the film industry as a figure of speech referring to unused footage not included in the finished film. Outside of the film industry, it may refer to any creative work unused in the final product.” — Wikipedia

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